Monday, April 21, 2014

Training programs for developers in FLOSS companies: a need

My Experience

When I started with Free Software, there was a need for training people in the new tools that were emerging, not just to users, but also to professional that came from the proprietary world. There, the formal learning culture, through certification, is well established. Due to the business models around the delivery of technical information from soft companies to its channel and customers, investing significant amount of resources in these certifications programs was justified. For professionals, it is a way to improve their curriculum and skills.

Before embracing Free Software, I developed my career in the training sector so I made a living trying to solve this problem for companies that were in the process of discovering Free Software.

In the FLOSS world, these investments is not seen as a "requirement". Although the Free Software commercial space is getting more mature and more and more companies provide these kind of trainings, the general mindset is that you learn by doing, that the code and resources are out there that the formal training is not worth it due to its high cost, that Free Software is a learning environment by itself and that, by simply providing "learning time" to your employees they will develop the skills and learn the concepts they need. It is the typical "engineering innovation" kind of culture.

At a management level, the culture of getting training is solid, but many Free Software companies fail in spreading that culture to the technical level. In my 15+ years as professional I have seen very few companies that takes seriously the improvement of employees skills through training, specially in the engineering area.

Training program

Like when leaning a new language, in order to improve your technical skills, formal training is needed, specially at two points in time:
  1. At the very beginning of your learning process, when you are facing something "new".
  2. When you reach certain level where improving is not a matter of practicing any longer. It is the case when you make yourself understandable but need to express properly.

In the same way professionals put effort in being efficient in their everyday tasks, it is smart to be efficient in learning new concepts, developing new skills. Formal training in the first case is about that.

In the second case, in my opinion, there is no substitute for formal training. There is a point in which your investment in "studying" is less and less effective, reaching a point in which investing effort in "improving" is not perceived as worth it anymore. Internal training should cover this second case.

Despite its cost, investing in having junior developers formally trained by senior ones is worth it.  Since nobody is senior in everything, seniors become juniors at some point and the other way around. So having regular training sessions covering the first case (introduction to topics) given by employees have interesting secondary benefits.

For the second case, I always recommend going for external trainers. Even in the case you have the experts at home, bringing external people always adds value, a different vision. It is important also that that person is not just a good professional, but a good trainer. It is not so common to find both skills in the same person....at home. If you have one of those.... send him/her to train your customers, not your employees. You will get a higher return.

Do not forget to evaluate and reward your internal trainers. Provide them training also, so they become better trainers. This actions should be part of a more general designed path to increase the number of engineers within your organization that can be successful facing customers and promoting the use of your products and technologies in events. It is what I like to call Engineering Marketing.

One of those secondary benefits you might have not think about is the technical documentation generated for these sessions. In some cases, specially when you are training in technologies or products your company develops, these material are a perfect base for the technical documentation you provide to customers. You can eat you own food also in this area or, at least, design it to give it an early try.

Technical support engineers and presales ones are used to "making themselves understandable". When thinking about creating or improving such a program, think about them as potential trainers. If you have technical writers in the company, involve them too in the material generation. Yes, it increases the cost of the program, but it increases the outcome too. So instead of focusing only in the cost, try to find ways to translate part of the output to your customers too, so the investment is also worth it from the "sales" perspective in the short/mid term.

Some tips about the training sessions.

In my experience, if your company is young, these sessions should take place on Friday, after lunch. It creates a good atmosphere during the less productive time of the week. It is the "fun time". If your company is a more senior one, it is harder to have a significant number of attendees on Friday afternoon so Thursdays afternoons, at the end of the day, would be the best option.

It always come a question when designing these sessions. Should they be part of the workday schedule or should they take place after work as optional?

In my opinion, these sessions should not be mandatory but they should become part of the working hours. They need follow up though, so evaluation is needed. There are many techniques to make these evaluation processes part of the learning process itself so they are not perceived as "boring". You also have to module the consequences of "failing" in these actions so you incentive participation. Having extra sessions for those who do not accomplish the goals can be a good compromise.

Who can you talk to you about this?

There are two people that I recommend you to contact if you want to know about a successful experience in having seniors training juniors as part of the organization culture. They are Miki Vazquez and Gonzalo Aller.

If you do not have a well established training program within your engineering dept. these two people might help you from different points of view: Paul Brown and Roberto Brenlla. They might help you to design and follow up a technical training program, in collaboration with your HR dept. and your technical managers.

Do you know other professionals or companies who are driving successful internal training programs for engineers (employees)? If so, please let me know. I would appreciate it, and some readers too.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Closing doors

Yesterday was my last day as KDE e.V. Board Member. As you know I have been the KDE Treasurer since April 2012. I will keep being part of the Financial Working Group so I will be able to help my successor during the landing process and in the future. I still have some leftovers to finish (reports) and I plan to write a couple of posts about our numbers, so you all know what it the situation of KDE e.V. in general....healthy, by the way :-) It is being a soft transition.

KDE e.V. is in the right time to be ambitious and heavily increase its resources to support KDE community. Several decisions have been made in this regard and they will be executed during this 2014. The financial situation is healthy enough to afford some level of expansion. So I think it is time for somebody else to come with energy and enthusiasm to drive these changes the following months/years. And we have that person so.....

KDE e.V. is a solid organization, well managed and with a Board that takes the financial area seriously. It has been a pleasure and a honor to be part of the Board.

On the other hand, my relation with SUSE will end this month. Working on openSUSE, an specially building and leading the openSUSE Team, has been a great experience. I wish them all the best, specially in their current main task, turning Factory into a "usable" rolling release by changing the development work flow/process. It is a goal with a high impact for openSUSE.
 
openQA has a nice present, a tremendous potential and future, not just from the technical but also from the business point of view. For those of you looking for a great place to work, consider SUSE. It was for me.

The last few weeks I have been temporary living in Prague. I love this city. I am not attending to openSUSE Conference (I am sure it will be a great one) and I am not sure if I will be able to go to Akademy-es, which is a pity since it takes place in Malaga, where I lived for three years, and it is organized by one of my colleagues, Antonio Larrosa. I plan to go to Akademy in Brno though.

As you can see, these are times for changes, after around two years putting my best in KDE e.V. Board and SUSE/openSUSE. I have no idea what am I going to do next but I am sure it will be exciting so I expect an article soon called "Open Doors". Otherwise....I will not know what to do with so much time, or maybe I will... write more posts. :-)

Friday, February 14, 2014

systemd analysis: a personal perspective

I have looked with passion the systemd case since a little more than two years ago. As some of you know my number one passion is innovation, sometimes I think than even more than freedom. From that perspective systemd is a great case for analysis.

To me, systemd is the confirmation of the existence of a establishment in the Free Software space. In early stages, yes, but is already there. People that changed the world once and, after being so long part of the solution, are little by little becoming part of the problem. Also about people that joined in the late nineties or first years in the XXI century this movement and know no other reality but the one they are living in. Many of them, from the innovation perspective, are nothing but qualified followers of the first group.

Do not give me wrong, I am not trying to be disrespectful or play "the smart observer" role here. I might be one of them. It is not up to me to judge this. Please take in consideration that the existence of these groups of people is nothing but the normal consequence of.... success and getting older. It is hard to scape from nature, right?

As usual in these cases, not just Lennart, but many of those who supported him, also those who sponsored these efforts, has suffered all kind of attacks. Sadly not just for technical, I mean ATTACKS. Even journalists have been involved. Yes, Free Software is also mature enough to have "yellow (technical) press" associated, political and business interests and people in different communities willing to use them against anybody who threaten the current status quo.

But this is something you have to be prepared to assume if you want to succeed in bringing key changes in mature environment. And Free Software is becoming a mature environment.

You cannot expect to change the current status quo if you are not able to assume heavy criticism. You cannot succeed any longer just by talking, trying to convince you are right from a technical level, being nice, transparent and open to get feedback. Playing as a good citizen is a must, of course, but is not enough any longer.

You need to sustain your effort for a while and have enough support (yes, financial too) to fight back while keep walking in the direction you believe in. If you are not strong enough, if you are not willing to make sacrifices, if you cannot or are not able to ignore the noise, the attacks from the establishment, no matter how popular they are or were, don't try it. Try instead to innovate in unexplored areas. It is
easier and more pleasant.

But is worse for all of us in the long run, I think.

To me there is a very interesting aspect to remark. Even if you want to change a pillar and you are ready to fight the dinosaurs (which is not a condition directly related with age, by the way), you need to have financial support, specially in key moments, to be able to execute your plans despite heavy criticisms. systemd would have never been successful without it, I think.

I cannot judge from a technical perspective if systemd is a step forward, one of those architectural changes that we all will regret or a very expensive road before getting a good solution. This post is not about technical evaluations or predictions. This post is about me believing that Free Software is still (also) about innovation, not just in new areas, but in those aspects that brought us here too.

No, we are not in the finish line. No, many of those who brought us here or are relevant today are prepared to take us to the next level. As in many other industries, the main forces against evolution are internal ones.

"If it works don't touch it" Or "Disrupting changes come through iterations" were popular statement among those who are not relevant any longer.... or will become. Should become.

Thanks Lennart, your sponsors and supporters for succeeding.... or die trying. My respects. I hope the future of Free Software will be in the hands of people like you.  we need it or something else will replace us. Maybe that is not bad either.

Two final remarks....
  • Please Lennart and colleagues, make sure systemd works very well. I do not want to eat my words in three years. There are some people out there willing to see me swallowing them ;-)
  • I regret writing about this today instead of some months ago. Now it has been too easy.

Monday, December 16, 2013

openSUSE 2016: taking a picture of openSUSE today

As some of you know, the openSUSE Team at SUSE is publishing a series of proposals to the openSUSE community in several key areas of the project. The first of those mails tried to provide a general picture of the project based, among other sources, on the data mining done during these past few months. 

Many of you do not follow the project closely or you do but are not subscribed to openSUSE mailing lists. I would like you to read the below article/mail and share your thoughts.

I believe that sharing a common understanding of the current strengths and weaknesses of the openSUSE project is helpful in order to agree on the steps to be taken in the near future and evaluating them. But above all, agreeing in an initial picture, even if not in the details, is relevant to have a chance to agree in the direction the project might take in the future.

Before reading the text of that first mail, posted below, there are three remarks to be made:
  1. I think some people from the openSUSE community has perceived this first mail as a negative criticism to the project and their contributors. Cold analysis based on numbers do not provide a complete picture of the project... but provides a good one, in my opinion. I wrote the below mail/article thinking about a better future, not to revisit a past I am part of. 
  2. A summary of the proposals was published in an openSUSE Team blog post. Please read it to get in context. As stated in that article, this first mail/article has as goal to share the motivations behind the later published proposals, trying to open a discussion about our current state that can lead us to agree on a picture we can use as starting point.
  3. At the end of the article/mail, I proposed some questions. If you are interested in answering them (I would appreciate it), please:
Otherwise, in order to keep the debate centralized (for record purposes also), I will post/summarize your answers and comments also in that mailing list.

----------
 
openSUSE 2016: taking a picture of openSUSE today


Once openSUSE 13.1 has been released, it is time for the openSUSE Team to focus on the future. We want to share some ideas we have about the project in general and factory in particular. The topic is not easy. so this mail is a little long and dense, but hopefully worth it. It won't be the last one so let me know how to improve it.

INTRODUCTION/GOALS
This is the first of a series of mails we will publish the following days with different ideas. The process we are proposing has no intention of pointing at anybody, revisiting the past or enforce any situation within the community. Our goals are:
  • Share a picture as a starting point of discussion.
  • Use the discussed picture as a reference to agree on actions we all can/want to execute. 

FIRST STEP: PIECES OF THE PUZZLE

One of the first things we did was digging into numbers that provided us information about the status of the project. Data cannot be the only source to create a complete picture, but it is helpful as first step.

In order to better understand the rest of the mail, you probably want to look the following references:
  • Alberto Planas talk at oSC13: openSUSE in Numbers[1]
  • Alberto Planas' slides from the above talk[2]
  • First openSUSE Team blog post: Numbers in openSUSE[3]
  • Second openSUSE Team blog post: More on statistics[4]
  • Jos post about numbers[5] 
One important note about the numbers: since most of the behaviors of the variables reflected on the graphs were consolidated, at some point we decided to stop adding effort in collecting numbers until 13.1 was released. Once the Release is well established, we will update them and evaluate the influence of this Release in the global picture.
 
I won't try to go very deep in the analysis. It would be too long. There are many interpretations that can be done based on the graphs. I will just point out the most relevant for our purpose. Feel free to add others.
 
Following Alberto Planas' order from his slides[2]...

1.- Downloads

The number of downloads do not measure our user base, but provide hints about the impact of the work done every 8 months, the potential new users we might bring to the project and, looking at pre-release downloads, the number of testers. 

Taking a look at the graphs, we can see that the overall number of downloads is growing at a slow path (slope). This behavior is not consistent in every release. For instance, 12.1 was more downloaded that 12.2 or 12.3. More and more people uses zypper for updating the distribution though.

2.- UUIDs (installations that update regularly)

  • Looking at the number of machines that regularly update against openSUSE repositories (daily, weekly and monthly), we can easily conclude that the situation is very stable. The speed of growth (daily and weekly stats) or decline (monthly) is low.
  • What the graph do not show is the acceleration. It has been negative (small in value) for quiet some time now.
  • When looking at the architectures, we see that x86_64 is more popular than i586. This behavior is accelerating, as confirmed in the download numbers collected for 12.3
  • When looking at the mediums where those installations come from, we clearly see three dominant ones: .iso (dvd version), ftp (net installs) and Live CD.
  • There is a relevant detail that Alberto mentioned in his talk. More than half, almost 2/3, of openSUSE installations are not using the last version many weeks after Release date. There is also a significant amount of installations using unmaintained or Evergreen versions.

3.- Factory and Tumbleweed installations/"users"

Factory is our ongoing development effort. As you can see in the graph, the number of Factory installations is constant. Tumbleweed was very successful when it came out. Many developers and bleeding edge users liked it. Its popularity is decreasing though.

4.- Contributors to factory and devel projects

The numbers of users that are submitting request to factory/devel projects is increasing. Now we have more non SUSE contributors. SUSE ones remain constant. The overall growth is about 27 new contributors per year, a little bit more than 2 new contributors per month.

5.- Social media and comparison with Fedora

openSUSE is, in the social media channels evaluated, in the range of Fedora. Comparing our numbers, I guess we all agree with this general trend that states that openSUSE is a more user oriented distribution than Fedora is. We have less downloads but more users (installations updating regularly).

SOLVING THE PUZZLE

All the above pieces shows a stable picture. Every sign of growth or decline is, in absolute and/or relative numbers, small except social media, due  to their explosion as communication channels (which I do not think is way different from what other Free Software communities are experiencing).

ADDING CONTEXT TO THE PICTURE

openSUSE coexist with other "coopetitors" (Free Software competitors+cooperators) and competitors (closed sources distributions). Touchscreens, cloud, big data, games...the Linux ecosystem is evolving and there are new users with new needs.

New players are consolidating their positions: Arch, Chakra, Mint... Ubuntu is moving to the mobile space, Debian is getting some attention back from previous Ubuntu users....

On the other hand, some distros that were relevant in the past have disappeared, our 13.1 has got more attention than previous ones, SUSE is healthy and willing to invest more in openSUSE in the future ...

In the above context, how is our "stable" situation perceived? How do we think it should be perceived?

INTERPRETING THE PICTURE

If we agree that the overall number of users of Linux based server + "traditional" desktop OS (let's remove the mobile/embedded space and cloud for now), is growing, not following the "market" growing trend might be perceived as a wake up call, a clear sign that improvements needs to be done.

But if we agree that we are playing in a risky and challenging field, stability can be perceived as a healthy sign.

After these months of analysis and discussions with both, contributors and users, I would like to ask you if you agree with the the idea that the first picture is more prominent than the second one. But, does the second one provide us a good platform to improve our current position?
 
SHARE YOUR OWN PICTURE

Let me propose you some questions:
  1. What other variables we should put in place to create an accurate picture of the current state of the project?
  2. What is the perception you think others have from the project?
  3. What is your perception, your picture?
To get some context you might want to take a look at the following contents:
  • Current strategy[6]
  • Ralf Flaxa keynote at oSC'13[7]
  • Jos article: Strategy and Stable[8]
  • Jos article: Strategy and Factory[9]
REFERENCES:

Please point us to other relevant references:

[1] Alberto Planas talk at oSC13: openSUSE in Numbers:
http://youtu.be/NwfohZ8RBd8
[2] Alberto Planas' slides from the above talk:
https://github.com/aplanas/opensuse-data/tree/master/osc13
[3] First openSUSE at SUSE team blog post: Numbers in openSUSE http://lizards.opensuse.org/2013/07/04/numbers-is-opensuse/
[4] Second openSUSE at SUSE team blog post: More on statistics http://lizards.opensuse.org/2013/08/23/more-on-statistics/
[5] Jos article about numbers:
---------------------------------

Monday, November 11, 2013

Summary about what the openSUSE Team @ SUSE is doing

openSUSE 13.1 is about to be Released (Nov. 19th) and I would like to share what the team I am part of is doing.

I joined SUSE in June 2012, almost 18 months ago. I haven't written much about anything during this time. And it haven't been because I hadn't time, but because I haven't have enough energy. I have received though these past months several requests to write a little about what I do at SUSE, so here we go....

The openSUSE Team is a good mix of long term SUSE employees and fresh blood, youth and experience, openSUSE and other distros background, on site and remote workers, people with management or commercial/customer support experience together with integrators and developers, people coming from R&D or product focus companies together with people with a strong community profile.... a very diverse (1 Taiwanese, 2 Czechs, 1 Dutch, 1 Serbian, 4 Spaniards and 3 Germans) and talented group. We also have trainees in the team. Having students is something I like because it helps any team to develop engagement skills.

The Team has as major focus the openSUSE distribution. It is element around which the whole project circles. It is the key point that sustain everything else in openSUSE. Obviously we put effort in other actions but we try that everything we do is directly related, have its roots, in the distribution, in the software. Obviously we are not the only force in openSUSE, not even the most numerous. There are hundreds (literally) of people that participates in this collective effort.

The team have a big impact since we are dedicated full time to work on the project, we have focused our activity in limited areas and we are fairly well organized. But in terms of effort, the rest of the community has a much bigger weight than my team... fortunately :-).

Those familiar with KDE will understand what I mean if I name Blue Systems work in the project today.

From the community perspective we have focused our action in two major areas:
* The openSUSE Conference.
* openSUSE news portal (marketing).

In 2012, like it happened before, SUSE took the lead in organizing the Conference. This changed in 2013. A group of contributors led by Kostas and Stella, reputed community members, organized it, opening the door for a new model within openSUSE.

SUSE role in the organization changed. Now we support the organizers in different tasks instead of leading the organization. For me, this is a relevant success story that should serve as example for many in the future. I feel very comfortable in this new role because the efficiency of our contribution has increased significantly. Organizing an event FOR a community is different than supporting the community in organizing THEIR event, right?

In marketing my team makes a significant impact by keeping the News portal as a reference point of information about openSUSE. We focus most of our action around the openSUSE Releases. We also link the innovation brought by SUSE into openSUSE with our community. We help SUSE Teams in marketing their work when it makes sense.

These two actions leave us little time for supporting further initiatives in the news portal. We do it once in a while though, not in regular basis. The situation in this regard is not much different than other communities I know. Keeping the main news portal up and healthy requires more people than usually is available. A more collective approach is what we all want. It is not an easy goal to achieve in any case.

So we basically have concentrated our effort in three main areas:
  • What we call "the future". You will know more about it soon.
  • The openSUSE Development and Release process, that will have openSUSE 13.1 as the main result, coming in a few days (November 19th).
  • Community work. Specially around the openSUSE Conference and the news portal.

I hope this overview provides some answers to those of you interested in what I am up to lately. You can follow closely our actions through our Team blog, that has Jos Poortvliet as main editor and the whole team as authors.

This week I am participating together with other colleagues in SUSECon'13 and openSUSE Summit 2013. If you are in the Orlando Area, FL, US, consider coming. You won't regret it.

Friday, November 08, 2013

Two risks when working as employee in Free Software communities

I would like to point two risks that I have experienced myself and as manager throughout the last few years working in open environments (Free Software Communities) or projects involving interactions with them.

1.- In any community, there is so much to do...., so many interesting and innovative areas, so many disruptive ideas that can make a difference. There are so many projects that, with a little extra effort and some knowledge, could improve so much....everybody would notice the change, the difference, the impact.

When working as employee or as sponsored contributor you interact with so many people that needs help, that deserves to be helped, that you can learn from... that if you are not strong enough, after a while, without noticing, a significant part of your agenda is somehow determined by those who you help. But although you work on the same project that they do, share principles and environment, they not necessarily share your goals, your responsibilities, your duties, your motivations.

Spreading the energy through different areas, working under demand instead of having a clear control of your agenda, focusing on short term results instead of mid term ones, becoming a pillar for everybody else work in detriment of your own goals, of your own results, is a common syndrome I have suffered myself for a while, specially when working remotely from home, and I have experienced as manager of teams and projects.

What makes the action of any team (or professional) significant in any environment, and particularly in a open ecosystem like a Free Software community, is their ability to maintain during a long period of time a sustained effort focusing its energy in a single point. Only when the plan is achieved or after a proper analysis, jumping to another one is the right thing to do (in normal conditions, obviously).

The effect is even bigger when those points of focus are linked, serving a mid/long term purpose, aligned in a concrete direction. Then the impact is multiplied by the alignment of other people around you.

A key toward success is selecting targets with high impact, spreading its positive effect through the entire project. This multiplying effect requires a high amount of energy in early stages (activation energy).  The chances to create a significant and direct impact in several areas of any project at once are very low unless your team is big... and many not even then.

So the first risk is the loose of focus and its consequence is a reduced impact of the work done.

2.- Working in a Free Software community is one of the most rewarding experiences I have had in my life. I feel appreciated. My contributions counts. Many people is aware of them. I can work to make them more noticeable. The more popular my contributions become, the more people express me gratitude. The more relevant I become, the more people listen and interact with me...

This process is a spiral that you can learn how to climb in an effective way after some years. We end up learning how to play the game.

When you are a long term contributor and you are in charge of a key part of a project this is exactly what might happen. You arrive to the top of the pyramid, which is a comfortable zone. Too comfortable sometimes. If internal and external balanced forces are not applied, like competition, an adequate professional environment, external pressure/challenges... even the best professional can become too pleasant.

Reward can become a strong drug. It might elevate you in a bubble that, in the mid term, might have a direct and negative impact in the quality of the work you deliver. This is specially true for engineers/contributors that lead significant areas of a community project in which there are not enough contributors to create quality assurance procedures. Or are not applied to the leaders.

The second risk is the lose of "self demand" and its consequence is the reduction of quality of your work.

In my case, changing responsibilities and working environments every few years have helped me. I am not sure to what extend though. Others should judge it, I assume.

Monday, October 21, 2013

A champion instead of a leader.

I am one of those who actively supported Canonical in the past. Mark Shuttleworth succeed in linking his success to our success in Ubuntu's early years. I believe that customers/users are smart. Ubuntu became, still is, the number one distribution for good reasons.

In his journey toward success, Mark played hard, too hard sometimes. Not many put attention on it because the results were spectacular. Some did. KDE did and we suffered attacks for not following the trend. What some didn't understand back then is that there was a price to pay for Canonical's success. Mark made that price unaffordable for KDE. We have being around for over 15 years also for good reasons. We survived the early attacks to Qt, Nokia's disaster...  and obviously we were confident we would survive the explosion of Ubuntu and Mark's particular way of understanding leadership. We had our own roadmap. We still do and put quiet some effort on explaining it.

But we as a community were not blind or insensitive to what Mark Shuttleworth and Canonical were doing. The fact that Kubuntu is the number one distro among KDE developers and that Mark has been in several Akademy is just a reflection of the way most people in KDE appreciated what he represented. Canonical's effort, Ubuntu success, has been good for all of us, including KDE. I have no doubt about it. There were more things we shared than those that separated us. I still think this is the case nowadays.

I use an Android based phone. I am becoming more and more concerned about the embedded space. Linux based devices are becoming more and more popular but our freedom has not increased significantly. We need a strong action towards freedom, focusing not just in software but also in data and services. At this point I think that the problem has been identified. Now it is more about taking action. This is why in KDE we have been working on it for some time. And this is why, once more, KDE and Ubuntu might share a vision. We have another opportunity to work together to achieve it.

The situation today is different from the one in which Mark's leadership was born though. Today he has a history that can be evaluated and the battle ahead of us in the embedded space has very little to do with the desktop one. Mark's action will need to leave a greater room for other players, for other opinions, for other technologies. He cannot expect to be followed this time just because his vision is shared, just because his success is good for all of us. He still don't seem to understand that, for many, it is very important how success is reached.

But to me there is something else he needs to demostrate. Mark needs to create a profitable project, compatible with the Free Software spirit, so he can sustain his effort long enough, unlike he did in the past. The battle we need to fight in the embedded world will be long and expensive. Mark has demonstrated he is not persistent enough. I don't know if it was because he did not want to or he simply couldn't. He failed explaining his "turns".

Instead of avoiding the mistakes he made in previous years, he is digging into them. Instead of searching for allies in his new effort, he moves toward isolation. Instead of concentrating more on making his project sustainable, he is increasing costs by creating new technologies on his own and increasing the barrier to adopt them. Instead of leading us toward a solution, he is dividing those who should fight by his side.

He works toward becoming a champion, not a leader.

Most of my colleagues has nothing against Canonical becoming a champion of freedom in the embedded space. He is putting his own money and reputation in place. All my respect for that. But many of us do not understand the motivations and reasons behind Canonical decisions (Unity, Mir... ). We are not stupid. Mark simply failed in explaining them. So it is hard for me to digest his irritation when KDE colleagues do not support him as he expected.

Mark Shuttleworth has done and will do many relevant actions for increasing our freedom. He has created a great company full of talent and positive energy, capable of achieving a remarkable success once again. Ubuntu is still a great community, of course. I wish them nothing but luck in this trip through the embedded world. I just hope Mark understands AND assumes the consequences of the choice he made some time ago: becoming a champion instead of a leader.

Meanwhile, I would like to see no more of this "Tea Party" game, that hurts us all so badly. My colleagues at KDE do not deserve it. Ubuntu community and Canonical employees either. Even Mark Shuttleworth's reputation deserves better than what he is receiving lately. It is in his hands to revert this situation that he has created. I encourage him to, at least, not making it worse. We all have enough challenges already.

Friday, May 31, 2013

Insides about the new openSUSE Team at SUSE blog

Yesterday we created a new blog [1]to communicate to our community and readers what do we do as a team within the openSUSE project. It is a collective effort and it will be part of our duties to create and publish contents for it.

Its main goal is to talk about what we do so in the long run, it becomes a reference channel to follow up the activity of the group of people that SUSE employs to work full time in openSUSE.

Once of the discussion topics we faced was how to make compatible this blog, that has a corporate nature, with our personal blogs, our work in the community and the motivations of our team members. It is a very interesting topic since it is not trivial in practice to separate the information you handle as employee and your work within a community, in a case like our ours, employees that work for a community.

The easy approach is to say that, by default,  all what we do is public and treated as "community" work, or the opposite, but there are many corner cases, some of them relevant, that are not cover by these general approaches. Usually this topic has no relevance until something happens, usually bad. We need to understand that, as employees, we hold a responsibility that, if non properly managed, can potentially harm our company. It also can hurt us as professionals or affect our community. Often you are not a perceived as a regular community member only, but as a company advocate/representative too.

As a manager, I have to make compatible the community interest, the personal interest of the people under my responsibility and the company interest. In a company like SUSE, specially when talking about openSUSE, conflicts are small in this regard. We are a very open company in general and in my area in particular. I am glad of being part of a company that understand Free Software.

But under certain situations, nobody is out of risk. I even face this limitations being the KDE Treasurer. Being open is one thing and publishing all the information is another one. Obvious in theory but....where are the limits in practice? Who should take care of ensuring those limits are respected? What measures should be taken to satisfy all parties interest? When managing information, how to be fair with your community, yourself and your company at the same time? 

It is impossible to clearly define how to react in every case, what things should be kept private and what things don't, how to deal with the information you get as an employee but should be publish as part of your everyday activity within the community....

But what is possible is to create a clear field in which the people involved can move as freely as possible, making sure that some processes are put in place to avoid harmful mistakes. But above all, you have to rely on people, train them and be close to them so they understand the risks and the possible conflicts. Experience usually helps a lot in this field.

Behind this team blog, there are some processes that try to answer some of the previous questions and concerns, reducing the risk for the company and the authors but, at the same time, keeping the spirit of our work and goals: being open. I will talk about the concrete measures in a couple of months, when we get some conclusions about their efficiency.

I hope you will find the blog interesting.

[1] Link to the blog: https://lizards.opensuse.org/author/calumma/

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Are you a senior KDE developer? Join openSUSE Team at SUSE

openSUSE Team at SUSE is looking for a senior KDE developer that is willing to join the company to work on openSUSE distribution and customer products where KDE technologies are present.

As those of you who are closer to KDE and/or openSUSE know, Will Stephenson has been leading this area the last few years. He is now facing new professional challenges within SUSE so we are looking for somebody that coordinates the openSUSE Team efforts related with KDE together with the openSUSE community, upstream and other SUSE Teams.

Our default openSUSE desktop, KDE, is obviously a relevant piece of our puzzle. But beyond pure KDE work, the selected candidate will also work in other areas of the distribution and will play an important role as openSUSE/SUSE advocate in technical forums.

openSUSE currently ships other desktops too so it will be important for the selected candidate to drive high levels of cooperation with the openSUSE GNOME (and others) team and upstream in cross-distro development efforts.

As a preferred choice, we are looking for a KDE developer willing to move to our Headquarters in Nuremberg, GE or to our office in Prague, CZ.

If you are interested, please check the opening details and send your CV through the SUSE Careers website. Links to your contributions to KDE and contacts for references are welcome.

In a more personal note......

Will, thanks for standing strong and work hard for openSUSE and KDE. Good luck in your new position.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Distribution hacker wanted: join the openSUSE Team at SUSE

openSUSE Team at SUSE is looking for a hacker willing to work on the openSUSE distribution with us. You can find the details of the job opening at the SUSE career website.

So we are looking for a software engineer with experience in a Linux distribution or a recognized upstream project, that wants to work full time in our distribution and enjoys being part of a community effort. 

He/she will work in English and attend to community events so some international traveling should be expected. We would like to increase our team located at SUSE offices in Prague (I love Prague), although Nuremberg/remote work are also options.

If you are interested, apply through the SUSE career website. Please do not forget to provide us links to your code and references if you have them. There are many other interesting openings at SUSE for senior and junior professionals, specially software developers. Put an eye on the Career page at SUSE website.